Undergraduate Math Bloggers

I was interested seeing how undergraduate math students used blogs (and related platforms, like Tumblr). So I posted a call on Google+ and Twitter: I'm looking for mathematics blogs written by undergraduate students. Any recommendations? I'll retweet/repost them as they come in. — Dave Richeson (@divbyzero) February 17, 2014 I received quite a few links. I’m looking…

Greatest living mathematician and expositor?

On Twitter I posed the following question: I got a great repsonse. Here is the complete—unedited—list of names (in alphabetical order). Micheal Atiyah Art Benjamin Andrea Bertozzi Manjul Bhargava Joan Birman Bela Bollobas Stephen Boyd María Chudnovsky Fan Chung John H. Conway Ingrid Daubechies Keith Devlin Marcus du Sautoy Jordan Ellenberg Joe Gallian Rob Ghrist…

Mathematics departments at liberal arts colleges

I’m often curious about how other mathematics departments do things—how they structure their curriculum, run the Putnam Exam, handle research projects, etc. This invariably leads to a lot of web searching. So I decided to put together a collection of links to mathematics departments at schools like mine (a small liberal arts college). Because I…

Math books for young children

I have a child in first grade and another who will be in elementary school in a couple years. So I’m on the lookout for good children’s books about mathematics. Below is a collection of books that I’ve read or that have been recommended to me. (I got some of these suggestions from people on Twitter.) I’d…

Google Translate now knows Latin

Yesterday Bruce Petrie (a graduate student studying the history of mathematics) and I were discussing Google Translate. While it is no substitute for a human translator, it is pretty good and getting better. In particular, it is perfect if you need a quick, approximate translation of a language that you do no know or don’t…

Exceptional MathReviews

If you have access to MathSciNet and are in the mood for some good laughs, head over to Kimball Martin’s collection of Exceptional MathReviews. He introduces his collection as follows: Were you ever looking up papers in MathSciNet and you found one that especially made you smile or laugh? And were you ever wishing that MathReviews…

The hitchhiker’s guide to infinity

I’ve had a few encounters with large numbers and the infinite lately. First, I came across this interesting blog post that asks how many times you would have to fold a piece of paper so that its thickness would be the same as the distance from the earth to the moon. It is a really…

Mathematical magic tricks for kids

My six-year-old son loves the website ActivityTV.com, especially their science, origami, cooking, and magic videos. I watched a few of the magic how-to videos with him and was pleasantly surprised to see that some of them had a distinctly mathematical feel to them. For example: Jumping rubber bands: topological properties of circles and linked circles…

Thirteen mathematically-inspired products

Just for fun, here is a list of 13 mathematically-inspired products that I’ve stumble upon recently. Klein bottle house Come in/Go away ambigram doormat Klein bottle bottle opener Chair made of Voronoi cells Tiling a floor with irregular pentagons A Möbius bridge The Pittsburg Steelers logo (and my blog post about it) Nesting Fibonacci kitchen…

Nested nations

Recently I wrote about a neat land/water recursion that I found. I’ve seen countries that are completely surrounded by other countries (called enclaves)—Lesotho and San Marino being two examples. But I had no idea just how recursive this could become. Michael Tobis left a comment with a link to an eye-opening post on his Pining for Fjords…

Happy tau day!

It is 6/28! Happy tau day—a day that is twice as fun a pi day! Let’s celebrate our new favorite mathematical constant:  Remember, as Bob Palais told us, is wrong! I’m a fan of tau.

12 scholarly hoaxes, randomly generated articles, and other tricky fun

Everyone loves lists. Just for fun, here’s a (very) loosely-organized list of scholarly hoaxes, randomly generated content, and other interesting tidbits. Some of these I learned about recently, some I’ve known about for a long time. Theorem of the day—This website creates randomly generated “theorems.” Rejecta Mathematica—This journal publishes only articles that have been rejected by peer-reviewed…